This board has been transferred to www.wsc.co.uk,

    why not join us there

One Touch Football - Archive   
my profile | directory login | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» One Touch Football - Archive » Books » Pick your five true classics (Page 7)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 8 pages: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8   
Author Topic: Pick your five true classics
smallweed
Member
Member # 1692

 - posted      Profile for smallweed     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In no particular order:

Pale Fire, Nabokov
Nostromo, Conrad
Under Milk Wood, Thomas
At-Swim-Two-Birds, O'Brien
Catch-22, Heller
Bleak House, Dickens

I know that's six but I couldn't decide which to leave out. I'd just have to roll a die and let one go at random. (Unless it came out as Pale Fire, in which case I'd roll again.)

Posts: 1606 | From: John McGlynn's bouncy army | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Alania Vladikavkaz Satie
Member
Member # 1570

 - posted      Profile for Alania Vladikavkaz Satie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Six for me as well, although in an air balloon and shark infested water scenario one would have to be first out of the basket.

Crime And Punishment-Fyodor Dostoevsky.
The Blue Hammer-Ross McDonald.
Maltese Falcon-Dashiell Hamnet.
The Big Sleep-Raymond Chandler.
Swag-Elmore Leonard.
The World Cup Murder-Pele(with Herbert Resnicow)

Posts: 1754 | From: The Magic Carpet. | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Duncan Gardner v8.2
Member
Member # 1425

 - posted      Profile for Duncan Gardner v8.2     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Gulliver's travels- Jonathan Swift

Around the World in 80 days- Jules Verne

Huckleberry Finn- Mark Twain

Good companions- JB Priestley

Siege of Krishnapur- Jim Farrell.

Posts: 2818 | From: Marching through Georgia | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lyra
Member
Member # 1669

 - posted      Profile for lyra     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
So five novels, yeah? Because otherwise it would all have to be Latin poetry.

1. The Seducer by Jan Kjaerstad
2. Can I please have The Periodic Table by Primo Levi. I think it counts.
3. The Good Apprentice, Iris Murdoch
4. The End of the Affair, Graham Greene
5. The Crimson Petal and the White, Michel Faber

Things that are already 'classic'. Again forgetting Greek and Latin

1. Madame Bovary
2. Villette
3. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
4. Middlemarch
5. Moby-dick

Novel sequences/series

1. Alms for Oblivion/The First Born of Egypt by Simon Raven
2. The Aubrey/Maturin novels by Patrick O'Brian
3. The Dalziel and Pascoe series by Reginald Hill
4. The Earthsea novels by Ursula le Guin
5. The Robicheaux series by James Lee Burke

can I also just say that I HATE the Great Gatsby. Urgh. Hate it.

Posts: 2387 | From: Arcadia | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sportinguista
Member
Member # 1693

 - posted      Profile for sportinguista     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann
The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevski
1984 by George Orwell

Posts: 995 | From: my Valladolid exile | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
The Batebe of Toro Foundation
Member
Member # 465

 - posted      Profile for The Batebe of Toro Foundation     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Then;
quote:
1. One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel Garcia Marquez <...chin trembling, defiantly...>.
2. Immortality - Milan Kundera
3. Go Tell It On The Mountain - James Baldwin
4. The Old Man And The Sea - Ernest Hemingway
5. At Swim-Two-Birds - Flann O'Brien

Now;
quote:
1.Pale Fire - Vladimir Nabokov
2.Ill Seen, Ill Said - Samuel Beckett
3.The Blind Assassin - Margaret Atwood
4.At Swim-Two-Birds - Flann O'Brien
5.Hard-boiled Wonderland and The End Of The World - Haruki Murakami


Darkmans is pretty close, but I'd need to read it again. And I'm not sure #s one and two are in the right order.
Posts: 17027 | From: your gaff, nicking stuff. | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lyra
Member
Member # 1669

 - posted      Profile for lyra     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
My favourite Atwood is The Edible Woman, but I guess I couldn't claim it's the best as such.

From 15 choices I have 5 women. I suppose that's OK. smallweed will not approve.

Posts: 2387 | From: Arcadia | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
The Batebe of Toro Foundation
Member
Member # 465

 - posted      Profile for The Batebe of Toro Foundation     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well, HBWATEOTW is my favourite Murakami, rather than the best.
Posts: 17027 | From: your gaff, nicking stuff. | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
smallweed
Member
Member # 1692

 - posted      Profile for smallweed     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Well I noticed we have two in common there Toro, which seemed like recoomendation enough for me to look up the others on your list.

But Margaret Atwood?

Posts: 1606 | From: John McGlynn's bouncy army | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
smallweed
Member
Member # 1692

 - posted      Profile for smallweed     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
smallweed will not approve
Yeah but one of them is George Eliot, who's an honorary man on the grounds of actually being good.
Posts: 1606 | From: John McGlynn's bouncy army | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
The Batebe of Toro Foundation
Member
Member # 465

 - posted      Profile for The Batebe of Toro Foundation     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
But Margaret Atwood?
Yep. Superb writer. Oryx and Crake is the book Michel Houllebecq wishes he could write, without the cuntishness.

Definitely check out The Blind Assassin; she spends four hundred pages basically telling you what the twist is going to be, and it's so breathtakingly audiacious when it happens that you are nevertheless shocked by it.

Posts: 17027 | From: your gaff, nicking stuff. | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lyra
Member
Member # 1669

 - posted      Profile for lyra     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
And the Robber Bride. And Life before Man. But I know smallweed will hate all of them.

South of the Border... is my favourite Murakami.

Posts: 2387 | From: Arcadia | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
smallweed
Member
Member # 1692

 - posted      Profile for smallweed     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Oryx and Crake happens to be the only one of hers I've read. And I suppose you might say it was a little bit like that one of Houllebecq's that I can't even remember the name of.

Both of them were okay, without doing much for me. (Though they were both spoiled a bit by rather crass scientific gaffes.)

You have managed to make The Blind Assassin sound sort of intriguing there, though.

Edit: Atomised, that was it.

[ 25.01.2008, 17:33: Message edited by: smallweed ]

Posts: 1606 | From: John McGlynn's bouncy army | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
garcia en dolor
Member
Member # 152

 - posted      Profile for garcia en dolor     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
duncan - why do you include around the world in 80 days?

the only atwood i've read is surfacing. it's the kind of book that can put you off an author for life. all i remember about it is the crashing boredom that enveloped me and made me wish i was at the bottom of one of those unsullied canadian lakes with water weeds wound tightly around my neck.

Posts: 13290 | From: murphyia | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
garcia en dolor
Member
Member # 152

 - posted      Profile for garcia en dolor     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
having said that, surfacing is one of her first novels. i suppose what i am doing is a bit like someone dismissing philip roth because they didn't like when she was good. maybe i will try the blind assassin...
Posts: 13290 | From: murphyia | Registered: May 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 8 pages: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8   

   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | WSC

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.2

    This board has been transferred to www.wsc.co.uk,

    why not join us there